These recommendations aim to determine the best way to invite women to organised breast cancer screening programmes and to determine if a decision aid is better than a regular invitation letter to explain the benefits and harms of mammography screening.

How to invite women aged 50 - 69

For inviting asymptomatic women aged 50 to 69 with an average risk of breast cancer (in whom screening is strongly recommended) to attend organised population-based screening programmes, the ECIBC's Guidelines Development Group (GDG)

  • recommends using a letter
  • suggests using either a letter:
    • with the general practitioner┬┤s (GP) signature
    • with a fixed appointment
    • followed by a phone reminder
    • followed by a written reminder.

Moreover, the GDG developed recommendations related to the use of electronic means. In those, the GDG suggests using a letter plus SMS notification or an automated phone call plus a letter.

If these strategies are not available, then, the GDG suggests either an e-mail or an automated phone call alone.

Finally, the GDG suggests not using:

  • a letter accompanied by a face to face intervention
  • a personalised phone call plus a letter.

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How to inform women about benefits and harms of screening (decision aid)

The ECIBC's Guidelines Development Group (GDG) suggests using a decision aid that explains the benefits and harms of screening over a "regular" invitation letter for informing women about the benefits and harms of breast cancer screening (conditional recommendation, moderate certainty of the evidence).

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How to invite socially disadvantaged women

To improve participation in screening programmes of socially disadvantaged women, the ECIBC's Guidelines Development Group (GDG) suggests:

  • using a targeted communication strategy over a general communication strategy (conditional recommendation, low certainty of the evidence)
  • not using a tailored communication strategy over a general communication strategy (conditional recommendation, moderate certainty of the evidence)
  • using tailored or targeted communication strategies (conditional recommendation, very low certainty of the evidence).

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How to invite women with intellectual disability

The ECIBC's Guidelines Development Group (GDG) suggests using a targeted communication strategy over a general communication strategy to improve participation in breast cancer screening programmes of women with intellectual disability between the ages of 50 and 69 (conditional recommendation, low certainty of the evidence).

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How to invite non-native speaking women

The ECIBC's Guidelines Development Group (GDG) suggests using a targeted communication strategy over a general communication strategy to improve participation in breast cancer screening programmes of non-native speaking women between the ages of 50 and 69 (conditional recommendation, low certainty of the evidence).

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